Monday, December 30, 2013

Calling All Soldiers

I, despite my greatest efforts,** have been incredibly inconsistent in my blogging this week. As in, I haven't done it at all. I guess you, faithful reader, have noticed this, so many apologies to you if you came to this blog looking for words of wisdom. Or a funny story. Or anything at all.

**That's a lie. There has been very little effort. What about it? I've been distracted. It's a busy time of year.

I hope you had a merry christmas, full of happiness and joy and I hope you got what you wished for--whatever that may be. And I offer you wishes for a happy and safe New Year, full of love, laughter, and merriment. So for now, I offer you another blast from the past. Enjoy, and many thanks for making 2013 a successful year of blogging.

Until next year!!

XOXO

(from Thursday, March 15, 2012)


Calling All Soldiers

I'm officially declaring war.

I discovered an article from The Roanoke Times (March 4, 2012) with this disturbing headline:

Young girls asking YouTube audience: Am I Pretty?

It definitely caught my eye, because isn't that part of what I've been talking about (perhaps ad nauseum) on this blog? The question that seems to burn in every woman and girl's soul...Am I Pretty?

Apparently, young girls are posting videos of themselves on YouTube and asking the world what seems to be the question of the hour, and they aren't stopping there. They are inviting the world to respond. And the world did. The article says, of a specific video--"The video, posted December 17, 2011, has more than 4 million views and more than 107,000 anonymous, often hateful responses in a troubling phenomenon that has girls as young as 10--and some boys--asking the same question on YouTube with similar results." (emphasis added) These girls think they are ugly, hate their bodies, and they take the feedback and "value as well as incorporate [it] into their own sense of worth, [which] can be devestating". Sounds familiar.

Does this alarm you like it does me? And I have been sitting here, for 35 years, as part of the problem and not the solution.

It's time to be part of the solution.

If I choose to continue looking to appearance as my main source of security, then I am leading the next generation into the same pitfall. The scary thing is, I don't even have to say a word. I will silently lead our daughters into a deadly trap that some will never see their way out of...unless I stand up and take action. I don't know exactly what taking action looks like, but it does mean I'm not sitting and waiting for something to happen, for someone else to change the world. Change can start with one person. I'm also calling my sisters to join me. I want to see the next generation, and the ones following, begin to see themselves as worthy in Christ. I want our generation to see the next as worthy enough to show them how and where to find their security. As women, we can't turn on each other, we have to stop seeing each other as competition and look at each other for who we really are: children of God, women with face and a story, somebody's little girl for goodness sake.

I'm praying that I stop the nonsense of beating myself over how I look (or don't look, as it were) now. Not tomorrow, or next week while I try to figure out whether I actually want God to change me, but right now. Beth Moore says in her study "The Inheritence" that God's priority is on our spirit, which means that no stronghold, oppression or bondage can sustain what God can do. Essentially, insecurity doesn't have to be insecurity anymore. I just have to ask Him.

It's time to declare war on this ugly insanity. God can do anything, He just needs willing participants. Will you join me?

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